ST DAY TRAIL 2 - CARN MARTH TRAIL

A more challenging trail taking in the open countryside and magnificent views from Carn Marth before descending to visit the open-air ‘Cathedral of Methodism’ at Gwennap Pit and exploring the village of St Day, once a major medieval pilgrimage shrine and a thriving town serving one of the wealthiest mining areas in the world.

The flooded disused granite quarry at the top of Carn Marth now sits amidst a peaceful wildlife habitat with distant views to both the north and south coasts. Look out for the drill testing quarry a bit further along from the flooded quarry. The rock faces of this now silent quarry are lined with thousands of holes created by the testing of the rock drills produced by the famous Holman Bros.

From here the trail descends towards Carharrack where you skirt round the village and continue on back to the Poldice valley.

Address: Fore Sreet, Carharrack

Lat: N 50° 13′ 47.09″
Long: W 5° 10′ 54.06″

OS Grid Ref: SW 73165 41466

Distance: 3.79 miles

Terrain: Moderate

Facilities available on this trail:

Parking – Parking at the start in Carharrack or come off the Coast to Coast Trail.

Picnic areas – Wheal Jewel Park, Church Street, St Day; Rugby field, Tolgullow, St Day

Eating and shopping – Village stores in both Carharrack and St Day. Tea room at Gwennap Pit.

Public housesThe Star Inn Vogue, St Day and The St Day Inn, Fore Street, St. Day

WCs – At rear of Community Centre in St Day and at Gwennap Pit when manned

Accessibility

Family and children friendly – the route is very steep in parts

Cycle Trail – good trail but some rough sections

Horse Riding Trail – trail is suitable

Walking Trail – a moderate to tough trail

Disability access – definitely not suitable for wheelchairs although some powerful scooters may make it up the hillside.

2017-03-07

St Day Trail 2

  • Author: trailZZzone
  • Created: 7th March 2017
  • Updated: 18th May 2017
Route type: Bridleway/Cycling/Walking Trail
Difficulty grade: Challenging
Disabled Friendly: Large Scooters

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  • Distance 8 miles
  • Time 3 h 42 min
  • Speed 2 mph
  • Min altitude 102 ft
  • Peak 755 ft
  • Climb 820 ft
  • Descent 820 ft
  • Distance Instructions
Label

Points of Interest

POLDICE VALLEY MINING

Poldice Valley, has a long history of mining related industry dating back to at least 1512. Among the many remains including walled mine shafts and chimneys are what is left of the mid 19th century arsenic works where arsenic was condensed from gases into crystal form which was then exported across the world for use in insecticides and industrial processes, such as glass making. Notable minerals mined Galena, Pyrites, Wolfram, Arsenic & Ochre.

Location: SW 74827 42311

GWENNAP PIT

Where John Wesley preached between 1762 and 1789, although Gwennap Pit is about 1.7 miles (2.7 km) to the north west of St. Day. The pit was caused by mining subsidence in the mid-18th century. After Wesley’s death the local people turned the pit into a regular circular shape with turf seats.

Location: SW 71721 41766

 

CARN MARTH

The flooded disused granite quarry at the top of Carn Marth now sits amidst a peaceful wildlife habitat with distant views to both the north and south coasts. Look out for the drill testing quarry a bit further along from the flooded quarry. The rock faces of this now silent quarry are lined with thousands of holes created by the testing of the rock drills produced by the famous Holman Bros.

Location: SW 71645 40824

CARN MARTH AMPHITHEATRE

After the purchase of the land on Carn Marth it was decided to convert the lower quarry into an open air theatre. At first this was a very rough and ready affair. Despite this and a power failure half way through, the first production, by Cornwall Theatre Company ‘The Three Musketeers’, was a tremendous success and generated much needed funds for the group. Enthusiastic audiences of over four hundred brought cushions, blankets and most importantly, food and drink.

Location: SW 71509 40716