ST DAY TRAIL 1 - CHURCHES & CHAPELS TRAIL

This trail takes you on a journey through the historic villages of St Day and Carharrack, highlighting the sites that tell the religious history of the area, from medieval pilgrimage, through a competitive early 19th century building boom in churches and chapels, to modern day spiritual centres that sit peacefully with the past.

St Piran’s Church built in the early 1880s as a mission church to serve the large mining population, St Piran’s Church features an unusual small wooden spire.

Gwennap Pit is a semi-natural open-air amphitheatre, known as the ‘Cathedral of Methodism’ in which huge congregations gathered to hear John Wesley preach between 1762 and 1789. For more information see: WWW.GWENNAPPIT.CO.UK

Likened by the Poet-Laureate, Sir John Betjeman, to “an ecclesiastical toy fort”, the Church of Holy Trinity, now known as St Day Old Church, was built in 1826-28 to accommodate a congregation of 1500 in the booming mining town. In 1956 a controversial decision was made to close the church due to structural concerns and the roof of the abandoned building was removed in 1985. Today, following stabilisation works, the church is used as a community venue and is open to the public during the summer months thanks to the tireless efforts of local volunteers. The history of St Day and the surrounding area is told on display panels inside.

Address: Fore Sreet, Carharrack

Lat: N 50° 13′ 47.09″
Long: W 5° 10′ 54.06″

OS Grid Ref: SW 73165 41466

Distance: 3.31 miles

Terrain: Easy

Facilities available on this trail:

Parking – This trail is devised as a loop off the Redruth and Chasewater trail, but if you want to explore it in its own right you can park a car in either St Day or Carharrack villages and pick up the circular trail there.

Picnic areas – Wheal Jewel Park, Church Street, St Day; Rugby field, Tolgullow, St Day

Eating and shopping – village store in Carharrack and St Day. Tea room at Gwennap Pit.

Public housesThe Star Inn Vogue, St Day and The St Day Inn, Fore Street, St. Day

WCs – At rear of Community Centre in St Day and at Gwennap Pit when manned

Accessibility

Family and children friendly – good trail but some rough sections

Cycle Trail – good trail but some rough sections

Horse Riding Trail – trail is suitable

Walking Trail – a gentle to moderate trail

Disability access – a bit too far to push a wheelchair but if you have an electric one or scooter you should be ok.

2017-02-09

St Day Trail 1

  • Author: trailZZzone
  • Created: 9th February 2017
  • Updated: 18th May 2017
Route type: Bridleway/Cycling/Walking Trail
Difficulty grade: Easy
Disabled Friendly: Small Scooters

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  • Distance 4 miles
  • Time 1 h 49 min
  • Speed 2 mph
  • Min altitude 236 ft
  • Peak 558 ft
  • Climb 394 ft
  • Descent 394 ft
  • Distance Instructions
Label

Points of Interest

St DAY OLD CHURCH

Likened by the Poet-Laureate, Sir John Betjeman, to “an ecclesiastical toy fort”, the Church of Holy Trinity, now known as St Day Old Church, was built in 1826-28 to accommodate a congregation of 1500 in the booming mining town. In 1956 a controversial decision was made to close the church due to structural concerns and the roof of the abandoned building was removed in 1985. Today, following stabilisation works, the church is used as a community venue and is open to the public during the summer months thanks to the tireless efforts of local volunteers. The history of St Day and the surrounding area is told on display panels inside.

Location: SW 73137 42343

St Piran's Church

Built in the early 1880s as a mission church to serve the large mining population, St Piran’s Church features an unusual small wooden spire.

Location: SW 73160 41417

BILLY BRAY MEMORIAL

Billy Bray worked as a miner in Cornwall and for seven years in Devon; during this time he was a drunkard and was prone to riotous behaviour. In 1821 he married Joanna, who was a lapsed Methodist and they eventually had seven children. Following a close escape from a mining accident he was converted through reading John Bunyan’s Visions of Heaven and Hell.

Location:

 

GWENNAP PIT

Where John Wesley preached between 1762 and 1789, although Gwennap Pit is about 1.7 miles (2.7 km) to the north west of St. Day. The pit was caused by mining subsidence in the mid-18th century. After Wesley’s death the local people turned the pit into a regular circular shape with turf seats.

Location: SW 71721 41766